JUNE/JULY 2016 PROGRAMMING

 

The Garden Party  / Thursday, June 16th, 5:00 – 8:00 pm.

12814543_849889375137867_1590031678150437230_nNamed after artist Trisha Baga’s performance art piece for our inaugural show, this party celebrates the first year anniversary of the Franklin Street Works Cafe’s initiative to create its own yummy in-house menus with the foodies and art lovers who make us the vibrant hub that we are! The cafe’s chefs are whipping up some garden-fresh wine and beer summer cocktails as well as a selection of festive happy hour bites for sale. This event is free and open to the public. RSVPs help us plan, so please email info@franklinstreetworks.org – spontaneous friends are welcome too! Rain date: Thursday, June 23.

 

ArtWalk in Stamford Downtown / June 24, 5:00 – 9:00pm

Franklin Street Works is participating in Stamford Downtown’s annual art party with hourly tours of “All Byte: Feminist Intersections in Video Art” at 6:00, 7:00, and 8:00 pm, along with complimentary snacks and wine! We will also be raffling off a free one-year membership.

 

Mug Shots and Mimosas / Saturday, June 25th, 11:00 am – 1:00 pm

13227068_895252003934937_7782224822603415253_nOur back patio is dog friendly and we hope you will bring your canine buddies to this event.  We’ll have a pooch photo booth and will capture you with your four-legged best friend. There will be mimosa specials and we will have human treats for sale and complimentary dog treats on hand. Dog not required. Rain Date: July 2.

 

 

Sunita Prasad Artist Talk / Saturday, July 9 at 4:00 – 5:30 pm

_MG_5000aExhibiting artist Sunita Prasad will give a free, public talk about her work. She will discuss past works that use parafictional, narrative, and research-based strategies to illuminate and challenge discourse on gender online, in public space, and in popular culture.  This includes her video Recitations not from memory, which is on view in Franklin Street Works’ current exhibition All Byte: Feminist Intersections in Video Art, and features women’s stories of gendered experiences read from a teleprompter by men Prasad enlisted via social media.

 

When Danger Came SmilingSaturday, July 23, Free, public reception from 6:00 – 8:00pm. VIP member reception from 5:00 – 6:00 pm.

For the exhibition Danger Came Smiling: Feminist art and popular music historian Maria Elena Buszek brings together work by contemporary artists who use popular music as a medium, subject, and reference point for activist messages. The show, which will be on view from July 23, 2016 – January 1, 2017, takes the title of an album by the pioneering, unabashedly feminist punk band Ludus, led by artist Linder Sterling, whose career—emerging in the first wave of punk in the 1970s—reflects the approaches in this exhibition.

 

SAVE THE DATE: November 12 is our annual benefit party from 5:00 – 8:00 pm

All Byte: Feminist Intersections in Video Art – Press Release

PRESS RELEASE PDF

“All Byte: Feminist Intersections in Video Art” features nine emerging artists whose work engages the inseparability of class, race, sexuality and other factors when addressing gender

Franklin Street Works, University of Connecticut-Stamford’s Women’s Gender and Sexuality Studies Program, and Sacred Heart University’s Masters of Film and Television Program have collaborated to co-curate “All Byte: Feminist Intersections in Video Art,” an exhibition of video works informed by intersectional feminist approaches. The exhibition will be on view at Franklin Street Works from April 9 – July 10, 2016. Opening reception is Saturday April 9th from 6:00 – 8:00 pm with a member VIP preview from 5:00 – 6:00pm.

Feminist conversations and scholarship around the inseparability of class, race, country of origin and other factors when contemplating gender are reflected in artworks that, among other things, encourage viewers to listen across difference and explore matrixes of power. Through a call for submissions, the curators also sought out emerging artists in order to explore “fourth wave” feminist approaches to video and film. “All Byte” features works made between 2013 and 2015 by nine artists or collectives: Michelle Marie Charles, INVASORIX, Kegels for Hegel, Sarah Lasley, Nicole Maloof, Virginia Lee Montgomery, Sunita Prasad, Legacy Russell, and Maryam Tafakory. This original exhibition is co-curated by the Program Director of Sacred Heart University’s Film and Television Masters school, Justin Liberman; Director of Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies at the University of Connecticut-Stamford, Ingrid Semaan; and Franklin Street Works’ Creative Director, Terri C Smith.

The term “intersectionality” was coined by feminist legal scholar and critical race theorist Kimberlé Crenshaw in 1989. This analytic frame aimed to disrupt the approach of “single axis analysis,” which treated race and gender as mutually exclusive. Instead, intersectional work looks at how social factors and systems of power interlock and shape each other. The “All Byte” co-curators chose videos that exhibit an understanding of intersectionality and a sophisticated or fresh use of the medium. When taken as a whole, these works address gender in concert with many other factors, including: exploring the queer body through a transformative journey; queering of influential, usually white male, theorists through song; placing the alienated female body in surreal parallel to the predominantly white, male tech industry; addressing the contradictions between the lyrics and images in hip-hop videos that often portray women as sexual props; recounting academia’s gendered power structures through parody and art history; exploring inaccurate, race-based assumptions about citizenship and experience; unearthing colonial histories, preserved in the street signs of a small American neighborhood; gender based medical practices; and more. Through the intersectional feminist lens, these artists shed light on systems that reinforce dominance to the exclusion of others and create narratives of inclusion and understanding.

ABOUT THE COLLABORATORS

Franklin Street Works is a not-for-profit contemporary art space whose mission is to manifest contemporary art projects in a professional and welcoming setting. Franklin Street Works aims to broaden community participation in the arts, contribute to a larger arts dialogue, and cultivate emerging artists. To date, the organization has exhibited the work of more than 250 artists, curated 20 original exhibitions, and organized approximately 100 programs, including talks, tours, and performances. Exhibitions have received accolades, including a two-year grant from the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, funds from the City of Stamford, a matching grant from Fairfield County’s Community Foundation, and funds from the Mertz Gilmore Foundation.

The Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies (WGSS) Program at UConn-Stamford was founded as a flexible interdisciplinary academic program devoted to the critical analysis of gender and the pursuit of knowledge about women. The WGSS program offers an undergraduate minor. Faculty and students in the WGSS Program explore the construction of women, gender, and sexuality in different social, cultural, political, economic, aesthetic, and historical contexts by combining methods and insights of traditional academic disciplines with innovations in interdisciplinary feminist scholarship. Our research and teaching illuminate the complex and changing local, comparative, and transnational processes that contour gender and sexuality; examine local, comparative, and transnational settings; and analyze the diverse narratives, structures, and patterns that shape everyday life, social institutions, and cultures.

The Film and Television Masters program (FTMA) at Sacred Heart University is a conservatory devoted to cinematic storytelling. Our program is designed to foster the next generation of storytellers through dynamic workshops and independent projects. FTMA’s home is in the heart of Connecticut’s “Creative Corridor” with close ties to neighboring New York City. Focusing on story and hands-on production, students learn the craft and techniques that will empower them to stand out in today’s new media market. Our program is especially unique in that our students complete their own professional portfolio while going beyond the classroom into professional environments. Through partnerships with media companies and guidance from industry professionals our students tailor their concentration to meet their career needs.

 

Cut-Up Installation Photographs

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Jennie C Jones, Shhh Fragments A&B, 2012, Professional noise canceling instrument, wire and felt Courtesy of the artist and Sikkema Jenkins, New York

 

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Lourdes Correa-Carlo, Between the Two, 2008, Wood, wax and Mylar, Courtesy of Artists Pension Trust

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Mariah Robertson, 95, 2011, Unique color print on metallic paper Courtesy of the artist

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Meredyth Sparks, Extraction (Black Checks, with padding), 2015, Digital print on canvas, fabric-wrapped stretcher Courtesy of the artist

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Jennie C Jones, You Make Me Feel Like 100 Billie Holiday Songs, 2004 Audio Mp3 File, Courtesy of the artist

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Jennie C Jones, From the Clusterfuck Bianca Series, 2013, Earbuds, twist ties, latex paint, Courtesy of the artist and Sikkema Jenkins, New York

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Susan Howe, From Tom Tit Tot, 2014 Letterpress on paper Courtesy of the artist, From Frolic Architecture, 2010 Letterpress on paper Courtesy of the artist

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Martine Syms, Vertical Horizontal Extended, Vertical Elevated Oblique, A Thread Or Line That Holds Things Together, 2015, Archival pigment print on Sintra, c-stand, sand bags, artists’ clothes, Courtesy of the artist and Bridget Donahue, New York

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Alexis Knowlton http://leadpipe.us, 2012, Website, Courtesy of the artist

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Phyllis Baldino, Objects from The Unknown Series, 1994 – 1996, Shaving Cream Thing, Straw Thing, Mayo Thing, Green Velour Pads Thing, 4th of July Thing, Chopstick Thing, Dildo Thing, Right Guard Thing, Black and Clear Thing, Marble-ized Thing, In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida Thing Mixed Media, Courtesy of the artist

 

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Heike-Karin Foell, 4 artist books (No. 90, 93, 113, 190), 2015, Drawing, xerox, collage on paper, Unique, Courtesy of Mathew Gallery, Berlin

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Nancy Shaver, To Richie Rich #2, 2014, Found metal, wooden blocks, dress fabric, Japanese fabric, Flashe acrylic, house paint, Courtesy of the Artist

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Lorraine O’Grady, Cutting Out the New York Times, Just the Two of Us, 1977/2010, Toner ink on adhesive paper, Courtesy of the artist and Alexander Grey and Associates, New York

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Lorraine O’Grady, Cutting Out the New York Times, Finding the one you love is finding yourself, 1977/2010, Toner ink on adhesive paper, Courtesy of the artist and Alexander Grey and Associates, New York. Cutting Out the New York Times, The Right Face For The Right Job, 1977/2010, Toner ink on adhesive paper, Courtesy of the artist and Alexander Grey and Associates, New York

Sheila Pepe, Non-sonic Room Divide, 2016, Crocheted, knitted, knotted and sewn textiles, Courtesy of the artist

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Cauleen Smith, Chronicles of a Lying Spirit (by Kelly Gabron), 1992 16mm film transferred to digital, Running Time: 00:06:30, Courtesy of the artist

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Dodie Bellamy, Cunt Norton, 2013 Book, Courtesy of the artist

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Call for Submissions – All Byte: Feminist Intersections in Video Art

All Byte: Feminist Intersections in Video Art, April 9 – July 10, 2016Franklin Street Works: Call for Video Submissions. Deadline March 13

Franklin Street Works is curating an exhibition of video works that are informed by intersectional approaches found in feminist scholarship, which have sparked discussions in arts/artist communities around oppression and privilege.  With this in mind, the exhibition will prioritize videos that are sensitive to listening across difference and/or explore matrixes of power.  While a handful of mid-career artists will be invited to participate, emerging artists are strongly encouraged to send works for consideration.

The video exhibition will take place at the not-for-profit contemporary art space, Franklin Street Works, Stamford, CT. It will be curated collaboratively by Franklin Street Works’ Creative Director, Terri C Smith; Director OF Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies at the University of Connecticut-Stamford, Ingrid Semaan; and Program Director of Sacred Heart University’s Film and Television Masters school, Justin Liberman. The curators will be invited to write a short essay on the exhibition (or included works), looking at the show through the lenses of their respective academic and professional disciplines. This will create new interpretive texts about the work of emerging and mid-career artists and reflect on the intersectional nature of the videos.

Each exhibiting artist (we estimate approximately eight artists will be chosen) will receive a screening fee of $150. There will be a student event at UConn, Stamford on March 21 at 3:30pmwhere several artists will be invited to screen their work and participate in a Q & A with students and the public. The transcript of this event will become part of the gallery handout for the exhibition. Artists participating in the March 21event (we estimate 3-4) will receive a $200 honorarium and be reimbursed for travel (up to $50).

All works must be able to be shown using existing A/V equipment, which includes: Mac mini, media players, DVD players, high lumen indoor projectors, HD flat screens (approx. 22”), speakers with subwoofers, high powered small speakers, and a handful of CRT monitors. There is no budget for build out, but FSW has one black box room that could be used for longer videos or works that require a separate room.

Deadline for submissions is March 13. Please send video links to Terri C Smith at tcamillesmith@gmail.com with the subject “All Byte” or mail Digital material (disks, flash drives, etc.) to Terri C Smith, 45 Franklin St, Stamford, CT 06901.

Franklin Street Works is a not-for-profit contemporary art space whose mission is to manifest contemporary art projects in a professional and welcoming setting. Franklin Street Works aims to broaden community participation in the arts, contribute to a larger arts dialogue, and cultivate emerging artists. To date, the organization has exhibited the work of more than 250 artists, curated 20 original exhibitions, and organized approximately 100 programs, including talks, tours, and performances. Exhibitions have received accolades, including a two-year grant from the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, funds from the City of Stamford, a matching grant from Fairfield County’s Community Foundation, and funds from the Mertz Gilmore Foundation.

The Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies (WGSS) Program was founded as a flexible interdisciplinary academic program devoted to the critical analysis of gender and the pursuit of knowledge about women. The WGSS program offers an undergraduate minor. Faculty and students in the WGSS Program explore the construction of women, gender, and sexuality in different social, cultural, political, economic, aesthetic, and historical contexts by combining methods and insights of traditional academic disciplines with innovations in interdisciplinary feminist scholarship. Our research and teaching illuminate the complex and changing local, comparative, and transnational processes that contour gender and sexuality; examine local, comparative, and transnational settings; and analyze the diverse narratives, structures, and patterns that shape everyday life, social institutions, and cultures.

The Film and Television Masters program (FTMA) at Sacred Heart University is a conservatory devoted to cinematic storytelling. Our program is designed to foster the next generation of storytellers through dynamic workshops and independent projects. FTMA’s home is in the heart of Connecticut’s “Creative Corridor” with close ties to neighboring New York City. Focusing on story and hands-on production, students learn the craft and techniques that will empower them to stand out in today’s new media market. Our program is especially unique in that our students complete their own professional portfolio while going beyond the classroom into professional environments. Through partnerships with media companies and guidance from industry professionals our students tailor their concentration to meet their career needs.